STORIES OF WOMEN IN YOSHITOSHI’S ONE HUNDRED ASPECTS OF THE MOON – TAASA Review September 2016

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This article was originally found in the September 2016 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 25, Issue 3, Page 7).

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Natalie Seiz I n 1914 the poet and writer Yone Noguchi (1875-1947) presented a lecture about Tsukioka Yoshitoshi at the Japan Society in London titled The last master of the ukiyoye art'.

Noguchi calls him a failure on the one hand, because of the Western influence that sways some of his work, yet on the other hand he praises his last series One Hundred Aspects of the Moon conceding its shortcomings aspure ukiyo-e’ but acknowledging Yoshistoshi’s `versatile’ talent (Noguchi 1915: 76-77).

This was most probably because, in this work, Yoshitoshi did not aspire to represent Japan’s modern age, but instead preserve a traditional Japan of the past ­ in line with Noguchi’s own sentiment. The bottom of the bucket/ which Lady Chiyo filled has fallen out/ the moon has no home in the water, Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, 1889, colour woodblock, ôban...