NICHOLSON MUSEUM, SYDNEY – TAASA Review December 2014

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This article was originally found in the December 2014 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 24).

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The objects were primarily from the site of Harappa, dated to 22501750BCE and included terracotta figures and animals, beads and stones tools, lamps and pots as well as a stamp seal depicting a "unicorn" or more accurately a mythical bull.

Throughout the 1940s new excavations in the Indus Valley such as those conducted by Sir Mortimer Wheeler, Director General of the Archaeological Services of India, at the site of Mohenjo-daro, revealed the extent and scale of the ancient Harappan cities and culture. Terracotta female figurines, Harappan 2500-1750BCE, Nicholson Museum, The University of Sydney Trendall also acquired material from governments, archaeological institutions and museums across West and Central Asia with a view to establishing a rich teaching resource at the University of Sydney.

Today the Nicholson’s Near Eastern collection spans from modern day Pakistan to Turkey and encompasses material from some of the great civilizations and archaeological sites of the Asian continent...