IRON WOOD RAFTERS UNDER ASSEMBLY. PHOTO: ANN PROCTOR – TAASA Review September 2013

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This article was originally found in the September 2013 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 22, Issue 3, Page 20).

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three tiered roof is unusual, as most temples only have two, however the decorative elements such as the screen on the ridge line and the finials that terminate the sweeping roofs resonate with earlier iconography. The weight of the roofs and their decorative elements produce a horizontal effect despite the overall height of the building.

As with traditional architecture, the building is divided into an uneven number of bays, in this case seven.

However, the wide three part staircase leading up to the main floor of the temple, flanked by sinuous stone dragon balustrades, is more characteristic of a Royal Palace than a Buddhist temple...