`SUPER TREES’ LOCATED IN THE CENTRE OF THE GARDENS. PHOTO: CRAIG SHEPPARD – TAASA Review September 2013

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This article was originally found in the September 2013 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 22, Issue 3, Page 15).

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while our very lives of high consumption and expanding urbanisation (over 50% of the world now live in cities) replace and destroy real natural bio-diversity that is now gone in many areas? Will botanical and edutainment' gardens be thego to’ natural experience of the future, in the way that zoos are now often repositories for remaining fragments of the animal kingdom? Is it appropriate for governments to promote their green credentials as an aspect of national commerce and marketability? Are we as global citizens creating a type of nature-speak' that appears to promote a sanitised and highly artificialnatural’ environment while simultaneously our actions allow its destruction? It would be unfair to single out the Gardens by the Bay or Singapore in this regard.

The majority of Singapore’s natural environment was razed in colonial times for cash crops, especially rubber trees.

A second wave in the form of national Housing Development Board (HDB) flats occurred when the city state under Lee Kuan Yew was established in the 1960s...