PORCELAIN STEM TRAY, MADE IN CHINA (KILN UNKNOWN) FOR THE THAI MARKET, EARLY 19TH CENTURY, MOST LIKELY RAMA II PERIOD (1809-1824), 21.5 CMS (D) X 10 CMS (H). COLLECTION OF PAUL BROMBERG – TAASA Review December 2012

UNLOCK THIS ARTICLE

This article was originally found in the December 2012 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 14).

The full article is available for free to TAASA Members.

Register

or Login

national epic derived from the Indian Ramayana — and various folk tales and legends. Floral designs utilise a range of tropical Southeast Asian leaves and flowers and, although some items are decorated almost exclusively with flora, stylised plant forms are more commonly employed as background or frames for deities, animals or birds.

A flamelike leaf pattern symbolic of the unbound flame of Buddhism appears frequently as do scrolls of tropical leaves, the lotus flower, and patterns of twisted stems. with the wings of a bird and a leaf-like tail; a Thepanom, a celestial being usually depicted in a worshipping posture, and a Thewada, a celestial being typically depicted in a seated position with outstretched arms.

The Thepanom and Norasingh motifs are the most common designs on bencharong. The style and designs of classical bencharong wares – as distinct from their modern marketoriented replicas – vary approximately with the reigns of successive monarchs with substantial overlaps but slightly different datings. bencharong pieces survived attrition by war, looting, weather and treasure hunters. Following Ayutthya’s destruction, the royal capital was moved for a short period (176782) to the then important garrison town of Thon Buri on the right bank of the Chao Phraya river...