PORCELAIN LIME POT, MADE IN CHINA (KILN UNKNOWN) FOR THE THAI MARKET, MID 19TH CENTURY, MOST LIKELY RAMA III PERIOD (1824-1851), 5.5 CMS (D) X 6 CMS (H). COLLECTION OF PAUL BROMBERG – TAASA Review December 2012

UNLOCK THIS ARTICLE

This article was originally found in the December 2012 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 15).

The full article is available for free to TAASA Members.

Register

or Login

Many designs of Lai Nam Thong wares, which were especially popular in the reign of Rama II, have been described as the most attractive of the Sino-Thai production.

A large range were used in this period and varied from traditional to innovations composed of birds, butterflies searching for nectar, and a Chinese flower design of a peony with small birds and squirrels. The classical period of both bencharong and Lai Nam Thong wares ended in the mid-19th century. During the 1851-1868 reign of Rama IV, the 1855 Bowring Treaty, signed between Thailand and the United Kingdom, opened up trade between the two countries to be followed by other similar bilateral treaties with foreign powers.

One consequence of this trade liberalisation was the import of European, blue-and-white Chinese and Japanese pottery into Thailand that resulted in a decline in the popularity of bencharong and Lai Nam Thong wares. In the last half of the 19th century some small scale efforts were made to overglaze blank or blue-and-white Chinese wares in the bencharong style and a few coarse pieces were even made entirely in Thailand...