SANG BO, SELF-PATTERNED SILK (SA) WRAPPING CLOTH FOR ORDINARY PEOPLE (MIN BO), KOREA, 1800S. COLLECTION MUSEUM OF KOREAN EMBROIDERY, SEOUL, KOREA – TAASA Review September 2011

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This article was originally found in the September 2011 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 20, Issue 3, Page 17).

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Colourful and highly decorative, traditional Korean bojagi are square or rectangular cloths made by women of all classes in the stratified Korean society.

They range in size from one pok (about 35cm square) to ten pok and were designed to be used to wrap, cover, carry and store both ordinary and precious household items such as clothing, bedding, food, jewellery and gifts. Bojagi were also used for ceremonial purposes and the observation of social rituals: special occasions and religious ceremonies were marked by covering the table or altar with a fine cloth, while gifts wrapped in a painstakingly stitched bojagi showed love or respect for the recipient.

It was understood that the maker’s wishes for the recipient’s happiness and good fortune were enfolded in the packaging...