CONFUCIAN CONCEITS: KOREAN PAINTING IN THE JOSEON DYNASTY Jackie Menzies – TAASA Review March 2009

UNLOCK THIS ARTICLE

This article was originally found in the March 2009 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 18, Issue 1, Page 18).

The full article is available for free to TAASA Members.

Register

or Login

I n selecting high points of the artistic heritage of the peninsula nation of Korea, one would choose the sublime celadons and exquisite Buddhist paintings of the Koryo period (918-1392), the boldly coloured folk paintings and robust ceramics of the Joseon period (1392-1910), and the increasingly sophisticated contemporary art.

However the breadth of painting in the Joseon dynasty is still not fully appreciated, and so the Art Gallery of New South Wales is mounting an exhibition of Joseon painting, selected from the large collection donated to the Musée Guimet in Paris by the Kamakura-based contemporary artist Lee Ufan.

The exhibition, entitled Korean dreams, comprises decorative paintings that draw on the multi-streamed Korean heritage of folk art, shamanism, Daoism, Buddhism and Confucianism. The advent of the Joseon period in Korea in the late 14th century witnessed the replacing of Buddhism by Confucianism, more specifically a distinctly Korean interpretation of Neo-Confucianism, as the official ideology...