UNDERGLAZED JOSEON PORCELAINS: THE CULTIVATION OF A KOREAN NEO-CONFUCIAN AESTHETIC – TAASA Review March 2008

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This article was originally found in the March 2008 edition of TAASA Review (Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 9).

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Penny Bailey F ollowing the toppling of Korea’s Goryeo dynasty (918­1392), the nascent Joseon (1392­1910) state adopted the example of its closely allied Ming dynasty in China (1368­ 1644) in installing Neo-Confucianism as the governing ideology.

This shift away from Goryeo’s predominantly Buddhist worldview impelled dramatic changes in Korea’s social, political, and cultural spheres.

In the arts, patronage moved from the monasteries to the imperial court, where early legislators commissioned objects conveying a sense of dynastic legitimacy, political authority and monarchic dignity (Kim 1993:35-36). Dragon jar, Korea, 17th century, porcelain painted in underglaze iron...